Bites on Salmon Fishing Charters

VANCOUVER’S PREMIER FISHING CHARTER COMPANY SINCE 1994

Bites on Salmon Fishing Charters

VANCOUVER’S PREMIER FISHING CHARTER COMPANY SINCE 1994

Bites on Salmon Fishing Charters

VANCOUVER’S PREMIER FISHING CHARTER COMPANY SINCE 1994

Bites on Salmon Fishing Charters

VANCOUVER’S PREMIER FISHING CHARTER COMPANY SINCE 1994

Bites on Salmon Fishing Charters

VANCOUVER’S PREMIER FISHING CHARTER COMPANY SINCE 1994

 Salmon Catch Facts

One of the questions we get from our guests are what types of fish or sea creatures will we be able to catch on our trips.

Please check the government website regarding seasonal closures and catch limits regarding the different types of salmon.

Chinook Salmon

Image from DFO

MouthTailOther distinguishing featuresAge at maturityFreshwater markings
Dark with black gums; large, sharp teethV-shaped silvery; spots on both lobesLarge spots on back3 to 7 yearsBody turns olive brown to black
*from the DFO

More on Chinook

For a long time, Chinook salmon has been a favourite in recreational fishery in the Vancouver waters. A powerful fish that can reach over 14 kilograms (30 pounds) in weight, it also goes by a few names such as King, blackmouth, quinnat, chub and Tyee.
Chinook are found in B.C. and in the Yukon.

The production of Chinook happens mainly in major river systems in B.C. along the Fraser River and up the Yukon River. After hatching, chinook remain in fresh water from three to 12 months before migrating. they are known to migrate vast distances and are found distributed throughout the Pacific Ocean. They tend to return to spawn between two to seven years. Our river systems tend to have one stock of chinook which also varies among seasons.

Their predators are the killer whales, and the Vancouver salmon recreational charters and commercial fishermen. Chinook are typically fished using spoons, hootchies and anchovy rigs that are trolled through the waters. Chinook are an unusual Pacific salmon species because the skin of adults can range in colours from white to pink to deep red. They feed in B.C. tidal waters.

They have a dark back, with a greenish blue sheen. As they return to spawn, their bodies darkens and a reddish hue develop around the fins and belly. Adult spawning males have enlarged teeth and the snout develops into a hook.

Coho Salmon

Image from DFO

MouthTailOther distinguishing featuresAge at maturityFreshwater markings
White, may have black edge, white gums; sharp, medium sized teethSquare, silver; some spots, usually on upper lobe; wide tail baseSpots on upper part of body3 yearsGreenish black head, red body
*from the DFO

More on Coho

Coho are fast, active fish. They are found in most B.C. coastal streams but their major territory lies between the Columbia River and the Cook Inlet in Alaska.

Young coho spend one to three years in freshwater before travelling to the ocean. They will spend up to 18 months at sea before returning to their natal streams to spawn. Most coho salmon return to fresh water as mature adults at three years of age.

Coho do not migrate long distances in the open ocean. They remain in coastal waters. They have the tendency to take lures and they jump and dodge making them a favourite among Vancouver sport fishermen.

As adults, coho have silvery sides and a metallic blue back with irregular black spots. Spawning males in freshwater show bright red on their sides and bright green on the back and head with dark colouration on the belly. They develop a marked hooked jaw with sharp teeth. Female spawners also change colour and develop the hooked snout.

Pink Salmon

Image from DFO

MouthTailOther distinguishing featuresAge at maturityFreshwater markings
White, with black gums; in marine areas, almost no teethV-shaped, no silver; large oval spots on both lobesLarge spots on back; smallest species2 yearsPronounced hump on male
*from the DFO

More on Pink

The pink salmon’s principal spawning areas are between Puget Sound, Washington, and Bristol Bay, Alaska. They migrate to their home stream from July to October, and while some go father upstream. The majority spawn in waters close to sea. During the spawning period, both sexes change from their blue to silver colouring then to a pale grey colour.

Their lifespan is only two years. Immediately after they hatch, the young enter the ocean. After a few days to several months in the estuary and near shore zone, they move out into the open ocean in large schools.

They feel on zooplankton, especially krill which gives their flesh the bright pink colour for which they are named.

Despite their short life span and small size, the Pink salmon travel extensively dispersing throughout the Pacific Ocean from northern California to the Bering Sea. During the fall and winter, the Pink salmon spend more time in the southern parts of their range.

Pink salmon are mainly caught by purse seine, gill nets or trolling gear. Vancouver recreational anglers generally catch pinks with the use of artificial lures.

Sockeye Salmon

Image from DFO

MouthTailOther distinguishing featuresAge at maturityFreshwater markings
White, may have black edge, white gums; sharp, medium sized teethSquare, silver; some spots, usually on upper lobe; wide tail baseSpots on upper part of body3 yearsGreenish black head, red body
*from the DFO

More on Sockeye

The sockeye salmon is the best known Pacific salmon because of its superior flesh, colour and quality. They are rich in oil content and their red colour make them a favourite with everyone.

Sockeye spawning areas are from the Fraser River to Alaska’s Bristol Bay. Most spawn in the late summer or fall.

The young stay in freshwater for a year or two before moving to the ocean. Once in salt water, BC sockeye move north and northwestward along the coast. They spend most of their time in the Pacific Ocean.

The interesting phenomenon for the sockeye is their “cyclic dominance.” It means that sockeye are abundant in one or every four years.

Sport fisherman are able to catch sockeye with spoons or bait. Best time to catch sockeye is between June to November because of their migratory behaviours. Sockeye were the first salmon to be commercially fished in the Pacific Regions and were the first salmon to be canned in quantity beginning in the 1870s.

Sockeye are silver in colour, with small black speckles along the body. When they return to spawn, they turn varying shades of red – resulting in a brilliant scarlet fish with a green head by the time they have arrived at their point of origin. This deep colouring, along with the rich cultural, economic and ecological history that continue to make sockeye a symbol in the Pacific Region.

Chum Salmon

Image from DFO

MouthTailOther distinguishing featuresAge at maturityFreshwater markings
White, tongue may be black; large teethNo spots, silver streaks covering about half of tail; narrow tail baseNo spots on back or tail; possible faint vertical bars on silver fish; white tip on anal fin3 to 5 yearsVertical bands on sides, may be reddish purple on male
*from the DFO

More on Chum

The Chum is also known as the dog salmon because of how the mature males look. It is the least sought-after of the Pacific salmon species. They spawn in many medium-sized streams and rivers throughout B.C. and the Yukon.

They spawn in short coastal streams and in the spring the migration of the fry move directly to the sea in a day or two. The young remain in fresh water for several months before reaching the ocean. They spend two or three summers at sea before returning to their home streams to spawn.

The Chum is an attractive fish. In tidal waters, they are metallic blue and silver, with occasional black speckling on the back. Spawning chum are recognised by the dark horizontal stripe running down their sides. The large males have canine-like teeth and a checkerboard or calico colouration. Chum salmon are the most widely distributed of the Pacific salmon.

The Bite is On!

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Bites On Fishing Charters

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Vancouver, BC
Canada

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